AUPIK- Maintaining home care infrastructures in disasters

In the AUPIK research project, pilot concepts and educational materials are being developed which aim to ensure close and sound cooperation between disaster management and outpatient care structures for needs-based support of people cared for at home in crisis situations.


Content orientation and results:

 

The research projects KOPHIS and INVOLVE have clearly shown that everyday life and disaster management systems need to be better interlinked.

People in need of care who are treated at home are often particularly vulnerable in crisis events. Disaster management and outpatient care structures are often insufficiently prepared for this group of people in emergencies, such as a power failure, and are not sufficiently coordinated in their response. The AUPIK research project, which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research within the framework of the security research programme and implemented in the model region of Magdeburg, addresses this practical need. Within the project, concepts are being developed on how civil protection and outpatient care structures can work with one another more closely in order to provide needs-based support for people cared for at home in crisis situations.

 

The name of the AUPIK project stands for the maintenance of home care infrastructures in disasters - Organisational concepts for increasing care infrastructures' resilience. Even in emergency situations , everyday structures should be maintained as long as possible in order to conserve resources and enable continuity of home care. The German Red Cross is developing appropriate pilot concepts and information and educational materials for the support of home care arrangements through disaster management, so that gaps in home care can be bridged, at least temporarily. Depending on the specific health care situation, however, home care may not (no longer) be possible.  For these cases, the GRC is developing a pilot concept and educational material for an "intensive care station“, which will enable the temporary centralization of decentralized, home care arrangements.

The AUPIK project builds on findings on vulnerable groups in crises and on a socio-spatial approach to  civil protection, which are the focus of research by the DRK.

 

Reference to recommendation for action:

AUPIK refers to the needs for action identified by the DRC: "Effects of demographic change on civil  protection", "vulnerable groups in crises and disasters", "disaster  services of the future" and "socio-spatial networking on the local level".

  • Service-Box BuildERS

     

    Project partners:International Centre for Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities at the University of Tübingen (consortium leader) Institute for Health and Nursing Science at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Vincentz Network

    Associated Partners: DRK regional branch Saxony-Anhalt e.V., Association of Sisterhoods of the DRK e.V. Dutch Red Cross, Austrian Red Cross, Swiss Red Cross, Federal Office for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief (BBK), AOK Federal Association, National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians, Federal Association of German Pharmacist Associations e.V. (ABDA), Office for Fire Protection and Disaster Relief, State Capital Magdeburg; League of Independent Welfare Workers in the State of Saxony-Anhalt e.V., AWO Regional Association Harz, German Hospice and Palliative Care Association e.V., German Society for Palliative Medicine e.V., SPECTARIS - Medical Technology Association, German Medical Technology Association (BVMed), ALS-mobil e. V., LOTOS - Out-of-hospital intensive care Mitteldeutschland GmbH, Nursing service - lifetime of the VdB Magdeburg e.V., Pflege Daheim Ingrid Gaworski GmbH, Home Care, Jedermann Gruppe e.V., Centre for Respiration and Intensive Care in the "Storkower Bogen" GmbH

    Funding source: Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Programme: Research for Civil Security

    Project description: will be added later

    Website BuildERS: will be added later

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